Zoning Permit Application Process

Header Image1

Zoning Permit Application Process

The Permit Process 

This describes the simplest process. Depending on your project the time to deliver requirements and complete reviews and hearings may vary.  Plan on no less than 45 days  and for a project requiring review by the Development Review Board or Design Review Committee add another 45 days plus 30 days to allow the appeal period to expire before you can start your project. 

                                       

  1. Contact the Zoning Administration Office; review your plans; apply for a zoning permit and pay the application fee.
  2. Your zoning permit application is reviewed by the zoning administrator only when it is complete with all supporting documentation. Within 15 - 30 days your completed application may be approved or denied by the Zoning Administrator. However, it may be referred for a public hearing before the Development Review Board and/or referred for review by the Design Advisory Committee and/or referred to the Agency of Natural Resources for review and comment. If so, a decision may take several weeks and additional fees may be required. 
  3. Once an application is approved, there is a 15 or 30 day appeal period required by state law before you can actually get your permit. During this appeal be sure to post the "P-Card" public notice where it can easily be seen from the street.
  4. After the appeal period ends, you need to come to the Zoning Administration Office to sign and pick up your Zoning Permit. You cannot receive your permit until you have completed any pre-release permit conditions and you will need to pay a recording fee of $10.00. You cannot begin work on your project until the effective date of you permit. 
  5. Be sure you have applied for all construction and environmental permits that you need to begin construction. (permits such as Act 250, waste water management, electrical, plumbing, mechanical, fire suppression, curb cuts, and excavation) These permits are issued based on your final site plan that was approved.
  6. During the project you can expect one or more construction permit inspections. If you find you need to make changes that are different from what was approved on the final site plan approved by your Zoning Permit, consult with the Zoning Administrator first so you understand how this may effect your permit.
  7. When you are almost done with the work you should request a final inspection to close out your project. This is sometimes called a Certificate of Completion or Certificate of Occupancy.  There is a $10 fee for this final inspection.
  8. PLAN AHEAD. Make sure you have completed everything in accordance with your Zoning Permit. Small changes can be approved by the Zoning Administrator. Bigger changes may require a new zoning permit. If there are still a few things that need to get done but you are otherwise ready to begin using the space you can request a temporary Certificate of Occupancy/Completion. This is a conditional certificate of completion. File your certificate in your records, and enjoy the result of all your hard work!